Gender Differences in Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of Texas Public High School

  • Dr. Deshonta Holmes Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. John R. Slate Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. George W. Moore Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. Fred Lunenburg Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. Wally Barnes Sam Houston State University
Keywords: Postsecondary enrollment, 2-year public institutions, 4-year public institutions, Gender, Texas Gender Differences in Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of Texas Public High School Graduates: A Multiyear, Statewide Study

Abstract

Examined in this study was the degree to which gender differences were present in the postsecondary enrollment of Texas public high school graduates at Texas 2-year public colleges and at 4-year public universities.  Specifically analyzed were the enrollment percentages of males and females for three academic years (i.e., 2012-2013 through 2014-2015) for Texas public high school graduates.  Over the 3-year time period analyzed, statistically significant differences were present in the postsecondary enrollment of Texas public high school graduates by gender.  Female Texas public high school graduates enrolled in both 2-year and 4-year public institutions at a higher rate than their male counterparts.  Moreover, females tended to enroll at 2-year institutions at a higher rate then 4-year institutions.  Implications of these results and recommendations for future research were discussed.

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Author Biographies

Dr. Deshonta Holmes, Sam Houston State University

Doctoral Graduate, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Dr. George W. Moore, Sam Houston State University

Professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Dr. Fred Lunenburg, Sam Houston State University

Professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Dr. Wally Barnes, Sam Houston State University

Director, Academic Success Center, Sam Houston State University

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Published
2019-12-16
How to Cite
Holmes, D., Slate, J. R., Moore, G., Lunenburg, F. C., & Barnes, W. (2019). Gender Differences in Postsecondary Enrollment Rates of Texas Public High School. SOCIALSCI JOURNAL, 5, 166-178. Retrieved from https://purkh.com/index.php/tosocial/article/view/596
Section
Research Articles