Ethnic/Racial Differences in Social Studies Skills: A Texas, Multiyear Analysis

  • Dr. Kristy Dietrich Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. John R. Slate Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. George W. Moore Sam Houston State University
  • Dr. Fred Lunenburg Sam Houston State University
Keywords: Ethnicity/Race, Taks, Social Studies, Social Studies Skills

Abstract

Investigated in this study was the degree to which differences were present in social studies skills as a function of ethnicity/race (i.e., Asian, White, Hispanic, and Black) of Texas high school students.  Data were obtained from the Texas Education Agency Public Education Information Management System for all Texas high school students for the 2004-2005 to the 2011-2012 school years.  In this study, statistically significant differences were present in the social studies skills by student ethnicity/race.  Asian students had statistically higher average raw scores in four of the five social studies skills objectives examined than White students.  Additionally, White students had statistically significantly higher average raw scores than Hispanic students, and Hispanic students had statistically significantly higher average raw scores than Black students for the eight years of data examined.  A clear stair-step effect was present by student ethnicity/race in social studies performance.  Suggestions for policy and for practice were made, along with recommendations for future research.

 

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Author Biographies

Dr. Kristy Dietrich, Sam Houston State University

Doctoral Graduate, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Dr. John R. Slate, Sam Houston State University

Professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Dr. George W. Moore, Sam Houston State University

Professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Dr. Fred Lunenburg, Sam Houston State University

Professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

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Published
2019-12-16
How to Cite
Dietrich, M. K., Slate, J. R., Moore, G., & Lunenburg, F. C. (2019). Ethnic/Racial Differences in Social Studies Skills: A Texas, Multiyear Analysis. SOCIALSCI JOURNAL, 5, 179-202. Retrieved from https://purkh.com/index.php/tosocial/article/view/597
Section
Research Articles